Remarkable images show long lost tribe living in South American jungle
Extraordinary new aerial photos show a contemporary uncontacted tribal community (Picture: Guilherme Gnipper Trevisan/Hutukara)

Remarkable images have emerged of the long lost Moxihatetema trible living in a remote part of the South American jungle.

The Moxihatetema people have shunned all attempts at outside contact, and live in complete isolation in the Amazon rainforest in northern Brazil.

Extraordinary new aerial photos show a contemporary uncontacted tribal community estimated to be home to 100 people in the Amazon. The village is in the Yanomami indigenous territory in the north of Brazil, close to the Venezuelan border. About 22,000 Yanomami live on the Brazilian side of the border, and at least 3 groups of them have no contact with outsiders. They are extremely vulnerable to violence and disease from outsiders. When their land is protected, uncontacted tribes can thrive. However, this area is currently being over-run by over 1,000 illegal gold miners raising serious fears that some of the most vulnerable people on the planet could be wiped out.

The Moxihatetema are one of three Yanomami groups living in the jungle (Picture: Guilherme Gnipper Trevisan/Hutukara)

Fears had been growing for the group after they were not seen for more than a year.

However, these images – taken from a passing aircraft – confirm that the tribe are alive and well – althouth not too happy at being photographed.

Extraordinary new aerial photos show a contemporary uncontacted tribal community estimated to be home to 100 people in the Amazon. The village is in the Yanomami indigenous territory in the north of Brazil, close to the Venezuelan border. About 22,000 Yanomami live on the Brazilian side of the border, and at least 3 groups of them have no contact with outsiders. They are extremely vulnerable to violence and disease from outsiders. When their land is protected, uncontacted tribes can thrive. However, this area is currently being over-run by over 1,000 illegal gold miners raising serious fears that some of the most vulnerable people on the planet could be wiped out.

The group can be seen living in their communal hut called a ‘maloca’ (Picture: Guilherme Gnipper Trevisan/Hutukara)

Zoomed in, the photos show one of the men angrily shaking his spear in the direction of the camera.

Uncontable tribes 2.jpg

Brazil’s Amazon is home to more uncontacted tribes than anywhere in the world. (Picture: Survival International)

The tribe are one of three monitored remotely after worries over clashes with illegal miners.

Miners have previously fought with remote tribes in the region after invading their protected lands in search of gold.

Uncontable tribes.jpg

There are thought to be at least 100 isolated groups in the Amazon rainforest (Picture: Survival International)

More images of the tribes can be found here.

 
 
 
 
By Lena Sullivan 11/18/2016 18:24:00

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